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Organization: Nuclear Age Peace Foundation
The following information may be cited or quoted as long as the source is accurately mentioned and the words are not taken out of context.
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PROGRESS: Has your organization seen progress toward a culture of peace and nonviolence in your domain of action and in your constituency during the first half of the Decade?

While progress has and is being made in some areas, it has not been sufficient to foment large-scale changes at the national level in the US.  European countries are tending to be more vocal in their calls for peace, while the US has seen its policies dictated by fear and militarism.  There has certainly been progress in the area of citizen mobilization, particularly around the Iraq war.  Mass movements have been established, and these have spurred a tremendous increase in online activism and participation around a whole host of issues.  In the nuclear policy arena specifically, coalition-building and discussions at the global level are moving forward.  Calls for US nuclear policy changes from US -based disarmament groups have gone largely unanswered, except in the base of developing low-yield and miniaturized nuclear weapons.  In this area, funding has been successfully stripped up until now, although the Bush administration continues to seek such funding.

OBSTACLES: What are the most important obstacles that have prevented progress?

Perhaps the largest obstacle facing progress in the area of peace and security has been the fear and militarism wrought by the terrorist attacks of 9/11.  A pervasive sense of militarism and unilateralism has infused US foreign policy to the extent that progress toward disarmament and other areas of international security have been very challenging.  This has also served to limit the effectiveness of the UN Security Council in acting on issues relevant to its charter.

ACTIONS: What actions have been undertaken by your organization to promote a culture of peace and nonviolence during the first half of the Decade?

The Nuclear Age Peace Foundation has undertaken many projects and actions since 2001 in promoting a culture of peace and nonviolence.  Among these are:
1.  Launching and conducting a campaign on charting a new course for US nuclear policy entitled Turn the Tide (www.chartinganewcourse.org)
2.  Participating as a member of the Middle Powers Initiative coalition to promote middle power states and civil society to work together toward a Nuclear Weapons Convention.
3.  Co-sponsoring a project on Moving Beyond Missile Defense with the International Network of Engineers and Scientists Against Proliferation (www.mbmd.org).
4.  Publishing a free online monthly newsletter, The Sunflower, on issues of nuclear policy and related issues pertaining to global security.
5.  Maintaining and adding to the Nuclear Files web project - a comprehensive site on issues pertaining to the Nuclear Age (www.nuclearfiles.org).
6.  Hosting an annual Symposium on critical issues of International Law bringing together policy and academic experts.  One of these symposiums has led to a coalition movement to create a United Nations Emergency Peace Service to respond to acts of genocide and other crimes against humanity.
7.  Conducting Peace Leadership Trainings for high school and college students to inspire and empower a new generation of peace leaders.
8.  Launching and conducting our UC Nuclear Free campaign seeking to divest the Univesity of California from its role in managing the US nuclear weapons labs (www.ucnuclearfree.org).
9.  Hosting a National Youth Conference (Aug. 2005) bringing together some 40 young people from across the US to learn how to be more effective anti-nuclear activists.
10.  Publishing a Nonviolence curriculum for high school educators entitled "Teaching Peace: A Guide for the Classroom and Everyday Life."
11.  Conducting an international peace essay contest for high school students.
12.  Conducting an international peace poetry contest for adults and youth.
13.  Publishing a Demilitarization Guide for young people.
14.  Hosting an annual Sadako Peace Day on the anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
15.  Presenting annually, our Distinguished Peace Leadership Award and World Citizenship Award to outstanding peace leaders.
16.  Hosting our annual Frank K. Kelly Lecture on Humanity's Future.
17.  Publishing a book on missile defense entitled "A Maginot Line in the Sky:  International Perspectives on Ballistic Missile Defense."
18:  Publishing an anthology of essays entitled "Hope in a Dark Time."
19.  Publishing two books on peace poetry, "The Poetry of Peace" and "Today Is Not a Good Day for War."
20.  Participating in the annual NPT PrepComs as well as 2005's NPT Review Conference and publishing and disseminating a briefing booklet at each of these conferences to state delegates on the progress of the Treaty.
21.  Publishing and distributing to members of the US Congress and all UN missions a briefing booklet on "The Iraq Crisis and International Law."
22.  Publishing and distributing to members of the US Congress and all UN missions a briefing booklet on "International Law and the Quest for Security" including issues relevant to the establishment of the International Criminal Court.
23.  Various speaking engagements, lectures and expert testimony on issues related to nuclear policy, international law and youth activism in many parts of the globe.

ADVICE: What advice would you like to give to the Secretary-General and the General Assembly to promote a culture of peace and nonviolence during the second half of the Decade?

We would like to suggest that the Secretary-General continue to speak out forcefully against unilateralism, militarism and human rights abuses as they weaken the international order and prevent the UN from fulfilling its charter.  We would further advise that the UN adopt an Emergency Peace Service that would allow the Security Council to quickly dispatch this all-volunteer Service in times of genocide and other crimes against humanity, particularly when political pressures make sending UN peacekeepers unlikely in the near-term.

PARTNERSHIPS: What partnerships and networks does your organization participate in, thus strengthening the global movement for a culture of peace?

Abolition 2000
Middle Powers Initiative
International Network of Engineers and Scientists for Global Responsibility
International Network of Engineers and Scientists Against Proliferation
Member of International Peace Bureau

PLANS: What new engagements are planned by your organization to promote a culture of peace and nonviolence in the second half of the Decade (2005-2010)?

We will be opening an office in Washington DC in 2005.

Postal address of organization

PMB 121
1187 Coast Village Road, Suite 1
Santa Barbara, CA 93108-2794 USA

E-mail address of organization

frontdesk@napf.org

Website address of organization

www.wagingpeace.org

Highest priority action domain of a culture of peace

International Peace and Security

Second priority action domain of a culture of peace

Education for a Culture of Peace

Highest priority country of action (or international)

United States

Second priority country of action (or international)

International
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Organization: Nuclear Age Peace Foundation

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