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Organization: Coalition for Work With Psychotrauma and Peace, CWWPP
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PROGRESS: Has your organization seen progress toward a culture of peace and nonviolence in your domain of action and in your constituency during the first half of the Decade?

We see little progress toward a culture of peace and non-violence in the ten years that we have existed and have been working in eastern Croatia, northern Bosnia and Serbia.  Despite ten years having passed since the end of the wars in the Balkans, tensions between and among groups are still high.  We see increasing rates of suicide and family violence.  There are many incidents of discrimination and civil violence that go unreported.  Return of people to their homes is at a virtual standstill and very little is being done by anyone to encourage it.   Although there has been some physical reconstruction, there is little work being done on the psychological state of people.  Economic progress is minimal.  There are high rates of unemployment.  There is still a large number of landmines in Croatia and Bosnia.  There is little progress on civil society issues, and the number of groups is still small, especially outside cities.  Those groups that do exist still have minimal skills.  Thus, there is still a great deal of work to be done.

OBSTACLES: What are the most important obstacles that have prevented progress?

We feel that the main obstacles are local and international politics and the attitudes of the agencies giving aid.  These attitudes unfortunately involve short-term approaches and relatively small sums of funds.  While the term sustainability is used, the need for long-term mentoring is negated.  Agencies have timetables for stages that are not based on the reality of local progress.  Many local and national politicians use the problems for their own gain.  Lack of capacity and training is another major barrier.  Funds are needed to train people in trauma, reconciliation, civil society and work attitudes.  The change from Communist/totalitarian to democratic and capitalist systems has not been assisted well.

ACTIONS: What actions have been undertaken by your organization to promote a culture of peace and nonviolence during the first half of the Decade?

We refer the Secretary-General and the General Assembly and others who are interested in the actions that we have taken to look at our website, www.cwwpp.org.  All documents and actions referred to below may be seen in detail there.
First, we have developed a flexible plan for training people in trauma, non-violent conflict resolution and civil society.  We have used this plan to train and mentor some forty groups on a long-term basis. This work clearly shows that self-help groups can be used to augment the deficiencies in the number of professions required in post-conflict areas.
We have also carried treatment of a number of groups, including former soldiers, women and the victims of domestic violence, the families of the mentally ill, invalids youth and those who remained in areas during the war.
We feel that particularly former soldiers and youth are priorities.  The former soldiers are highly traumatized and they generally have weapons to carry out further violence.  They are, in many cases, the causes of the problem.  Thus, if further violence is to be prevented, there must be a great deal of attention paid to their problems.
Youth and children are another priority.  The work must not only be in the development of "youth skills" but in dealing with their deeper problems, that is, their direct traumatization and the transmission of trauma to them by their parents, teachers and other important persons.
We have found that it is necessary to work at the levels of the individual, the family, the group, the neighborhood, the community and the society.
One of our most important actions has been and will continue to be the founding of a field institute for post-conflict studies.  This institute will include centers for inter-religious and inter-ethnic dialogue, psychological trauma and health in general, civil society and democratization including all societal factors that contribute to further development, non-violent conflict transformation and human rights.
The general aim of the institute is to research factors that contribute to violence and those that assist in diminishing it.  Another aim is to bring together theory and practice.  The interns whom we have had in the course of our ten years of existence have indicated that much of what they are learning in the classroom has little to do with what they see in the field.  Further, we have heard complaints from people in the field that programs do not meet their needs.  Another aim of the institute is to look at these questions and to develop programs that will truly meet the needs of post-conflict areas.  We thus will bring together academics on the one hand and those in the field on the other.  Further, an aim of the institute is to train people who will develop policy and programs in the future.

ADVICE: What advice would you like to give to the Secretary-General and the General Assembly to promote a culture of peace and nonviolence during the second half of the Decade?

We would urge the Secretary-General and the General Assembly to work on long-term integrated plans such as our Strategy of Complex Rehabilitation for integration, return and reconciliation.  We would urge them to concentrate on capacity building and such issues as psychological trauma, transmission of trauma and predjudice and the basics of civil society and democracy.  These must be actions as well as words.  The funding of such actions must at very least be equal to and should exceed the amount spent on military actions.  Local people should be listened to.  We would urge the support of actions such as our Field Institute for Post-Conflict Studies to research effective ways of working with conflict.

PARTNERSHIPS: What partnerships and networks does your organization participate in, thus strengthening the global movement for a culture of peace?

The CWWPP is participating with a number of local organizations in various programs.

PLANS: What new engagements are planned by your organization to promote a culture of peace and nonviolence in the second half of the Decade (2005-2010)?

A complete strategic plan for one, five and ten years for the CWWPP is given on our website.
We plan to continue the work of developing reconciliation and the rejuvination of the societies in this region through integrated work on psychological trauma, non-violent conflict resolution, democratization and civil society.  We will do this through a combination of capacity building, research and field work.
The Field Institute for Post-Conflict Studies is an important part of our plans for the second half of the Decade.  We plan that academic and other institutions will become part of it and that it will expand.
We wish also to expand our work to other regions.

Postal address of organization

Gunduliceva 18
32000 Vukovar
Croatia

E-mail address of organization

cwwppvuk@zamir.net

Website address of organization

www.cwwpp.org

Highest priority action domain of a culture of peace

Understanding, tolerance, solidarity

Second priority action domain of a culture of peace

Sustainable development

Highest priority country of action (or international)

Croatia

Second priority country of action (or international)

Bosnia
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Organization: Coalition for Work With Psychotrauma and Peace, CWWPP

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