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Organization: Institute for Global Leadership
The following information may be cited or quoted as long as the source is accurately mentioned and the words are not taken out of context.
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PROGRESS: Has your organization seen progress toward a culture of peace and nonviolence in your domain of action and in your constituency during the first half of the Decade?

Our indicators include:
-the extent to which altruism is embodied in each of the participant leaders so that whatever or all of the eight keys of a Culture of Peace they select-- Respect all life, Reject Violence; Share with Others; Listen to Understand; Preserve the Planet; Rediscover Solidarity; Work for Women's Equality; Participate in Democracy-- they will bring their global citizenship, philanthropy, unique calling and public spirit to that key area.
-the extent to which the leader is secure within oneself for a new definition of security.
-the extent to which her/his ideals relate to a sustainable peace for a focus in a community, institution, government or multilateral entity that has been affected both socially and politically by the participant leader.
-the extent to which the vocational nature of the participant's work has been re-visioned.
--the extent to which the participant envisions her/his work as reflective of the largest vision of humanity for a society of compassion, integrity and excellence.
--the extent to which the participant plans to implement the information gained in the orientation in their role at the Institute.
-the extent to which the information gained in the orientation changed the way the participant will teach another human being

We have seen some progress as the participant leaders enter into the course work, vocational support and competency development.  We don't expect the leaders to have completed meeting the indicator parameters until the end of the third year of training.

OBSTACLES: What are the most important obstacles that have prevented progress?

As a pilot programme, we would like more people to join us.  We are fortunate that key people have committed the resources for many do not have the resources or the commitment for three years of training.

ACTIONS: What actions have been undertaken by your organization to promote a culture of peace and nonviolence during the first half of the Decade?

The Institute for Global Leadership offers three actions:

1. The Decade calls forth the evolution of humankind so that security resides within each human being. The Institute for Global Leadership provides for the evolution of humankind by training Reconciliation Leaders™, practical idealists.  The leadership arises from the leader’s vocational calling, skillbuilding, and a commitment to be at peace in oneself and in service to others for a post-competitive society.  

Our training is for seasoned or emerging leaders who would like to lead others based on their unique gifts and special calling.  A major change in consciousness about citizenship is required.  We are part of the over six billion actual citizens of the United Nations which was founded as "We the people".  We are responsible for direct participation in the challenging processes of emergent governance in the United Nations itself through our personal mission focus and our tools and techniques of reconciliation.  

We have launched a year-long training programme (Introduction, Basic and Advanced) in Reconciliation Leadership™ to train vocationally-called participant leaders who want to be of service for the Culture of Peace.  They learn new skills and develop their calling with sensitive and skilled guidance. The programme is unique because it helps leaders tap their internal strengths to better promote peaceful resolutions to conflict.  The approach has broad applications to family feuds, community and national disputes and global challenges.  The methods learned are useful to professional and international peacemakers as well as anyone interested in creating a just, sustainable, multiethnic and intercultural world community.  Participants are welcome from all sectors and may participate in the full programme or take individual modules on their own.

This model of leadership is provided to go beyond the leadership and politics of self agrandizement and self interest to work for the common good.  Our leaders develop a foundation of ego strength from their unique calling, special gifts and greatness.  A global work ethic is facilitated to face past human self-defeating destructive behaviors in the new light of their calling.  We must be "spiritually young and creative enough to dream new dreams, conceive new myths, birth new social systems and nurture an expanded sense of identity and community to address the spiritual and systemic lag in human development that perpetuates war (Mische 1995).

Our learning methodology provides personal, interpersonal, systemic and global competency building. The cycle of violence is addressed from a larger framework than victim or perpetrator, believing that perpetrators were once victims without a healing intervention.

This leadership includes more balance of work and home life, reflection, meditation and/or prayer time, a methodology to deal with the high level of stress in people's lives and a vision and broad world view for the importance of humankind at this important moment in our history.  More of us is needed as well as a higher level of intelligence and spirituality than that which created our global crises.  We can provide the assistance to change the United Nations from reaction to prevention by training leaders to be proactive implementing their mission statement.


The Introductory, Basic and Advance Programmes follow.  In an initial consultation, potential participants are shown how this programme can enhance their own life and work challenges.  They are encouraged to try one or two courses before enrolling in the whole programme.

Implementing the International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Nonviolence for the Children of the World (2000-2010)
and supporting the Millennium Development Goals

Patron: Mr. Anwarul K.  Chowdhury, High Representative and Under-Secretary-General, Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States.  

Director:  Virginia Swain

Reconciliation Leadership™ for a Post-September 11th World
Introduction, Basic and Advanced Certificate Programs
November 2005- November 2006

To be held at the United Nations in New York
and CRRC Counseling Center, Tiverton, Rhode Island USA.
To implement the International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Nonviolence for the Children of the World (2001-2010) and support the Millennium Development Goals

Reconciliation Leadership™ is a systems approach to peace allowing leaders to be practical idealists.  This leadership arises from the leader’s vocational calling, skillbuilding, and a commitment to be at peace in oneself and in service to others for a post-competitive society.  

The Reconciliation Leadership™ Certificate Programs are offered to emerging and existing leaders called to create a just, multiethnic, intercultural sustainable peace –in their community, institution, national or global setting of their choice. More of our humanity is needed now to address the world leadership vacuum.

People may not have thought of yourself as a traditional leader or seasoned leaders may have an unexplored calling to leadership and the resolution of local and/or global challenges.  If your understanding of leadership is about influencing others in a deeply respectful and empowering way; if you do not not know how to achieve your goal, we hope you will call to see if trust can emerge between us so we may be of assistance.  

Being effective leaders in the current global reality requires different values, skills and experience than what leaders have brought to a September 10th world.  For information, www.global-leader.org call Virginia Swain, Director, Institute for Global Leadership, for application, tuition information & interview at 508-753-4172, ext. 3.  

Introduction to Reconciliation Leadership™ (Four Courses)

Work, Purpose, Place and Peace Friday-Sunday, November 18-20, Tiverton

The Practice of Reconciliation Leadership™ Friday-Monday, December 9-12, New York

Reconciliation of Polarities and Certificate Ceremony, Friday-Sunday, January 20-22, Tiverton

Writing a personal mission statement for the International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Nonviolence for the Children of the World (2001-2010) 15 hours of individual mentoring with Virginia Swain at the convenience of the participant leader

Basic Reconciliation Leadership™ Program (Five Courses)

Sustainability Aspects of Reconciliation Leadership February 10-12, Tiverton

Anger and Conflict Management Friday-Sunday, March 10-12, Tiverton

Re-visioning the Relationship between Man and Woman Friday-and Certificate Ceremony, Sunday, April 7-9, Tiverton

Mentoring Module  Participant leaders will receive 20 hours of mentoring with Virginia Swain, Director, throughout the Modules to integrate the teachings, skills, and the leader's vocational calling into one's life, work, and relationships.

Advanced Reconciliation Leadership™ Program (Six courses)

Designing and Implementing Interventions for Community, Institutional, Systemic, National and Global Change Monday-Friday, June 5-9, 2006, New York

The United Nations and the Harmonization of Nations: An Evolving Process Monday-Friday, July 10-14, New York

The Practice of Reconciliation Leadership™ August 14-18, New York.

Practicum  September-November

Integration Module and Certificate Ceremony Saturday-Monday, November 17-19, Tiverton

Mentoring Module; Participant leaders will receive 20 hours of mentoring with Virginia Swain, Director, throughout the Modules to integrate the teachings, skills, and the leader's vocational calling into one's life, work, and relationships.
Included in the course is a group dedication of mission to the United Nations at the end of the program.

The Purpose of the Reconciliation  Leadership™ Certificate Programs:

• To educate people, communities, institutions, nations to build trust and healthy relationships as a basis for leadership
• To provide an experience of leadership based on vocational service
• To motivate and support the work of reconciliation by men and women.
• To serve and provide renewal and resources for emerging and seasoned vocationally-called leaders in institutions, organizations, communities, nations and international affairs.
• To educate leaders in the philosophy and techniques of creating reconciling environments, combining visionary, historic and pragmatic approaches.
• To provide leaders with new thinking for prevention, post-conflict and protracted, historic, organizational, community, and global social, environmental and economic conflicts.
• To provide Reconciliation Leaders for a global mediation and reconciliation service for pacific settlement of disputes (Chapter 33, UN Charter) internationally.
• To provide an academic curriculum combined with vocational, spiritual and psychological education for healthy multiethnic communities, institutions, nations and global situations.

Contact Virginia Swain, Director for tuition information. Room and board the responsibility of participants.

The patron of the leadership programme is Ambassador Anwarul K. Chowdhury, UN High Representative and Under-Secretary-General, Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States. The program is dedicated to the International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Nonviolence for the Children of the World (2001-2010). Ambassador Chowdhury played a key role in implementing the General Assembly intergovernmental resolution for the Decade.

To prepare for the launch of the Certificate Programme, in 2002, Ms. Swain and Under-Secretary-General Chowdhury successfully launched a pilot programme at UN Headquarters, Designing and Implementing Interventions for Global Change.  In five presentations, 75 participants from 15 countries attended. Speakers in the program have included diplomats, international civil servants and non-governmental organization representatives.  

2.  In 1999, at the Hague Appeal for Peace, we proposed a Global Mediation and Reconciliation Service™ for the United Nations itself.  Innovative approaches to diplomacy need to be integrated into the United Nations system to help them reconcile their own conflicts first before they can offer assistance to others.  We have researched the Truth and Reconciliation Commissions in the light of the United Nations Charter and have found that a provision for a mediation and conciliation service under the guidance of the Security Council approved by the General Assembly in Article 22 was never implemented.  At present Good Offices, conciliation, mediation are used to address conflicts.  Tools and techniques of reconciliation are  offered through the Institute for Global Leadership as support for the Good Offices of the Secretary-General.  

We provided a proposal that implements the General Assembly Reoslution 39/11 stating that the "Peoples of this Planet have a Sacred right to Peace" has to start within the Secretariat and the Member States first before they can offer it to those in need. We believe our services will address those who have forgotten their higher calling and who have become disrespectful, denigrating and even corrupted. We believe in every person's potential for transformation in the light of new knowledge of resources and special calling. We offer our services for that process to occur.  The Service is based on a theoretical and practical approach to reconciliation as three starting points:  relationship building, encounter activities to express grief, loss and the anger that accompanies injustice, and innovative reconciliation techniques that exist outside the mainstream of international political traditions (Lederach 1998).  A historic, visionary and restorative framework is always present to provide resources for a just, sustainable, ethical, non-violent and humane society.  

Successful graduates of the leadership programme are eligible to be facilitators in the proposed Global Mediation and Reconciliation Service™.  The Eight Keys of A Culture of Peace are at the Heart of the Ideals of this Service.

As part of the Culture of Peace and the Global Mediation and Reconciliation Service preparation, there has been a five-year effort to train and support 22 teen peer mediators to reconcile student, teacher and administrator conflicts in an inner city high school in Worcester, MA.   Children and adults from 30 cultures make up the population of this educational community, including recent immigrants from war-torn countries and child soldiers.

Other consultation case studies include a UNDP invited reconciliation project in Mindanao, Philippines, with refugees from the genocide in Rwanda and ex-Yugoslavia which can be viewed at www.global-leader.org. Also,  A Peacebuilding Process of Reconciliation to Develop Political Will, developed over fourteen years after Celebration of the Children of the World: A Model for Building Global Community, has evolved to be at the ready for post-conflict peacebuilding and restoration after crises (even at the United Nations itself).

3.  A Mantle of Roses: A Woman's Journey Home to Peace (Xlibris 2004), a personal memoir by Virginia Swain, is offered as a resource as one Reconciliation Leader's™ personal journey from the business world to the United Nations.  

ADVICE: What advice would you like to give to the Secretary-General and the General Assembly to promote a culture of peace and nonviolence during the second half of the Decade?

In Davos in 2002, The Secretary-General asked for a soft infrastructure to address the ills of the global economy.  The ills of the global economy have created a leadership vacuum that requires excellence, commitment, integrity and a deep personal commitment to the ideals of the UN Charter. We have answered that call for a soft infrastructure in a learning methodology that acknowledges unique calling, competency building (personal, interpersonal, systemic and global) and a desire to be at peace in oneself and in service to others for a post-competitive institution and society.

We believe that the UN is still a cold war system: the divisions of the world are not able to be reconciled; systemic efforts to change the system fail as they cannot be sustained; the way to affect sustained change is through historicizing and parallel development, among other models we use in our change interventions.

The Secretary-General is invited to encourage staff and member state delegates to undertake our training for the Culture of Peace.  In these dark days of 2005-06, we need the light of people who will claim their calling and gifts as a foundation upon which to face their limitations.  This is such a program.

We also offer our reconciliation processes as a resource to the Secretary-General for the UN reform effort.

PARTNERSHIPS: What partnerships and networks does your organization participate in, thus strengthening the global movement for a culture of peace?

We are a member of the Global Compact , the Academic Council of the UnIted Nations, and many networks of peace scholars and practitioners. We participant in too many groups to list here. Let it be said that we believe in that power of coalition building and did so quite effectively in our cornerstone peacebuilding process for the UN in 1992, Celebration of the Children of the World:  A Model for Building Global Community.  We built such a strong coalition of United Nations Agencies, Member States, Secretariat Departments and NGOs that the then SG Boutros Boutros Ghali provided all the resources from the weight of his Office to help us implement the Celebration programme. The programme was designed to help UN community members to forget their titles and roles for a day to join in our common humanity to work for the common good.

PLANS: What new engagements are planned by your organization to promote a culture of peace and nonviolence in the second half of the Decade (2005-2010)?

Continuation of our 12-course program for the first year of three years of training

Our second and third years will be announced in January of 2006.

The availability of the Global Mediation and Reconciliation Service for the Secretary-General's personal resource in the UN reform effort.

Postal address of organization

Box 20044, Worcester, MA 01602

E-mail address of organization

vswain@global-leader.org

Website address of organization

www.global-leader.org

Highest priority action domain of a culture of peace

Education for a culture of peace

Second priority action domain of a culture of peace

Understanding, tolerance, solidarity

Highest priority country of action (or international)

International

Second priority country of action (or international)

United States
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Organization: Institute for Global Leadership

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